Inventing Abstraction, 1910–1925 is on view through April 15, 2013 at The Museum of Modern Art. Find out more at MoMA.org/inventingabstraction.


Posts tagged charts


Here is a bibliography of art historical charts »

compiled by our librarian Jennifer Tobias.

The diagram we created for Inventing Abstraction is part of this larger tradition. 

Abstraction was not the invention of a single figure, as it is often perceived, but a product of network thinking. We created a chart that marks connections between artists whose acquaintance or correspondence during the period of the exhibition could be documented. A key premise, seen throughout the show, is that creativity and sociability are linked.

And here are some earlier posts about charts.


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Mar 28, 2013
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A 1913 chronological chart for the Armory Show

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The Armory Show, a celebrated modern art exhibition held in New York in 1913, was conceived in a historical way, intended to trace recent developments in modern art from its roots in the nineteenth century. To this end the artist Arthur B. Davies, then president of the Association of American Painters and Sculptors, created a chronological chart “showing the growth of modern art.” He published it in the special issue of the magazine Arts and Decoration in March 1913, dedicated to the exhibition.

MoMA is celebrating the centennial of The Armory Show with a series of videos about works made in 1913.


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Feb 28, 2013
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From our colleagues at the library:
momalibrary:

More on art history charts. Discovered this on a recent pilgrimage to the Tate Modern. Tate Artist Timeline is a print version of this large-scale installation by illustrator Sara Fanelli. -jt

From our colleagues at the library:

momalibrary:

More on art history charts. Discovered this on a recent pilgrimage to the Tate Modern. Tate Artist Timeline is a print version of this large-scale installation by illustrator Sara Fanelli. -jt


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Feb 7, 2013
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Artists have also created diagrams of the history of modern art, within which they positioned their own work. Here is a chart of Dada movement made by Francis Picabia in 1919. He made it for the Dada Anthology issue of the Zurich magazine Dada, edited by Tristan Tzara, where it was reproduced on pink paper.The original drawing is in the collection of The Museum of Modern Art.

Learn more about this drawing


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Feb 6, 2013
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We heard that the original image of the 1930 Uffizi brochure we uploaded was not of high enough resolution. Here is as good a version as tumblr would allow, alongside the front and back covers of the booklet in which the chart was published.


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Feb 4, 2013
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Another diagram of the development of modern art—one that Alfred Barr himself had seen—is Miguel Covarrubias’ Tree of Modern Art - Planted 60 years ago, which was published in Vanity Fair in 1933.
For more on the charts see Robin Cembalest’s article in ArtNews

Another diagram of the development of modern art—one that Alfred Barr himself had seen—is Miguel Covarrubias’ Tree of Modern Art - Planted 60 years ago, which was published in Vanity Fair in 1933.

For more on the charts see Robin Cembalest’s article in ArtNews


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Jan 30, 2013
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Here is another chart mapping network thinking in the history of art. This one was published in 1930 (!) by the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Its goal and value are clearly stated in the introductory blurb: “The Chart is primarily designed to aid history of art students to trace the rise, growth and decline of painting during the Renaissance period… Its aim is to assist memory, rather than to educate. … The value of the Chart and its usefulness to visitors to the picture galleries and churches of Italy is obvious.”

Here is another chart mapping network thinking in the history of art. This one was published in 1930 (!) by the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. Its goal and value are clearly stated in the introductory blurb: “The Chart is primarily designed to aid history of art students to trace the rise, growth and decline of painting during the Renaissance period… Its aim is to assist memory, rather than to educate. … The value of the Chart and its usefulness to visitors to the picture galleries and churches of Italy is obvious.”


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Jan 28, 2013
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The chart in our show is not the first to map the history of modern art. The Museum’s first director, Alfred Barr, made a famous one for his landmark exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art, in 1936. Our typography and font were chosen in homage to his. Barr’s handwritten versions of the chart are preserved in MoMA’s Archives.
Here is one example of Barr’s handwritten chart in MoMA’s Archives

The chart in our show is not the first to map the history of modern art. The Museum’s first director, Alfred Barr, made a famous one for his landmark exhibition Cubism and Abstract Art, in 1936. Our typography and font were chosen in homage to his. Barr’s handwritten versions of the chart are preserved in MoMA’s Archives.

Here is one example of Barr’s handwritten chart in MoMA’s Archives